Sophomores: The Forgotten Grade

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Sophomores: The Forgotten Grade

©Greg Vote

©Greg Vote

©Greg Vote

Dani Bonafede, Staff Writer

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Seniors- the big guys on top.

Juniors- the kinda big guys almost on top.

Freshmen- the new kids that are still figuring things out that get booed at pep rallies.

That’s all fun and games, but what happens when the freshmen move up? When they leave ninth grade? Much like the “o” in sophomore, they are often forgotten. A whopping quarter of the school, left out of the picture. Sure, they have classes and exist in extracurricular activities, but who cares about the sophomores? The Clarion has reached out to various sophomores to get their take on this wretched situation.

 

Clarion Interviewer: Do you feel left out as a sophomore in high school?

Sarah Ahmad: Well, I don’t personally feel left out because I know upperclassmen from sports. There’s nothing important about being a sophomore. You have your freshman, like ‘oh, the new kids,’ and you have the seniors as the people who are leaving, and the juniors as wannabe seniors. There’s nothing significant about being a sophomore.

Abby Reicher:  Yeah, I know upperclassmen from sports, too. I feel like if you don’t play sports you’re sort of missing out, though.

Beth O’Boyle:  No, if I didn’t play sports I would say yes, though. I’ve made a lot of upperclassmen friends from playing sports so I don’t really feel left out.

Jaycob Castillo:  I feel like a middle child.

Jack Ponticelli:  Yeah, I guess. When you’re a freshman everyone pays attention to you because they hate you, but when you’re a sophomore no one pays attention to you.

 

Well, there you go, folks. If more sophomores were interviewed, you would reading one redundant article- without the help of others, sophomores would not be relevant at all. So next time you’re out and about, in school, or sitting at home, remember the sophomores (and the middle children).

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